elderly schizophrenia and dementia

objective  to estimate the age-specific incidence and prevalence of dementia diagnoses among older us adults with schizophrenia and in a comparison group without serious mental illness (smi). for this study, 11 years of us medicare data were used to examine the age-specific incidence and prevalence of dementia diagnoses among people 66 years or older who had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia and in a comparison group of older adults without serious mental illness (smi). for the analyses of incident dementia diagnoses, individuals with any claims with dementia diagnoses or prescription claims for a cholinesterase inhibitor or memantine hydrochloride in the 12-month baseline period were excluded. by 80 years of age, the prevalence of vascular dementia diagnoses was 15.6% (446 of 2866) in the group with schizophrenia and 1.5% (32 141 of 2 134 602) in the group without smi.

notably, the prevalence of diagnosed dementia among people with schizophrenia at 66 years of age was similar to the prevalence of diagnosed dementia at 88 years of age for the group without smi. because dementia was diagnosed at younger ages in the group with schizophrenia than in the group without smi, the magnitude of the increased incidence and prevalence was larger among people in their late 60s than among older people. in this cohort study, the prevalence and incidence of dementia diagnoses was markedly elevated among older adults with schizophrenia compared with individuals without an smi. role of the funder/sponsor: the nimh had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

prevalence of dementia by the time of medicare eligibility was significantly elevated among individuals with schizophrenia, a retrospective cohort study found. by 80, incidence of dementia diagnosis increased to 216.2 per 1,000 person-years (95% ci 179.9-252.6) for those with schizophrenia and to 32.3 per 1,000 person-years (95% ci 32.0-32.6) for the comparator group. “i would even suggest that they may be underestimating the prevalence of the two diagnoses combined,” lindenmayer said. but jeste said he was not surprised by the study’s findings, noting that individuals with schizophrenia typically develop various diseases at younger ages than the general population, including cognitive diseases.

the study used medical data from january 2007 to december 2017 on over 8 million people in fee-for-service medicare and part d, including 74,170 individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia and 7,937,603 individuals without a diagnosis of an smi. those from the control group could not have had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or recurrent major depressive disorder during the qualifying year. jean-pierre lindenmayer is working on a grant with scott stroup that does not involve dementia or cognition. medpage today is among the federally registered trademarks of medpage today, llc and may not be used by third parties without explicit permission.

another 2018 studytrusted source found a close correlation between very late onset schizophrenia and developing dementia. people with very late recent clinical and neuropsychological studies have shown that severe deterioration in cognitive and functional capacities is prevalent in elderly, conclusions dementia in schizophrenia seems to be a real entity with a neuropsychological signature similar to that of frontotemporal dementia., paranoid schizophrenia elderly, paranoid schizophrenia elderly, paranoid schizophrenia, dementia, dementia vs alzheimer’s vs schizophrenia, bipolar schizophrenia and dementia.

compared with adults aged 66 years or older without serious mental illness, those with schizophrenia showed a higher likelihood of developing dementia, with risk increasing with age. the researchers noted that the link between schizophrenia and dementia is not well understood, which prompted them to perform this study. as the term might suggest, people with dementia-related psychosis have the decline in thinking and problem-solving skills of dementia, as well the prevalence of dementia in older adults with schizophrenia is expected to increase significantly. older individuals with schizophrenia in the us, a prevalence study of 18 740 medicare beneficiaries reported that 21% of older adults with schizophrenia (n = 208) were diagnosed, late-onset schizophrenia vs dementia, schizophrenia and dementia rating scale.

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